e-Artexte

Are you interested in learning more about a particular Canadian artist? Do you need to find information about an exhibition that took place in Canada after 1965?

Look no further than e-Artexte, a library catalogue that contains over 23,000 records for contemporary Canadian art publications.

e-arte

In addition to being a robust reference tool, e-Artexte functions as a digital repository that houses exhibition catalogues, critical essays, magazine/journal articles, conference papers and artist-initiated publications. Look for the PDF symbol to download the full-text document.

Virtual Exhibitions

What are they?

Virtual exhibitions are curated online spaces that have become increasingly popular in recent years among museums, educators, art galleries and other cultural institutions. With a virtual exhibition, there is no need to worry about hours of operation or trying to visit a different city (or country!) every month. In some cases, virtual exhibitions go beyond simply presenting cultural objects in an online format; they are designed to make the visitor feel as though they are actually walking through an exhibition space (for an example of this, check out the Valentino Museum).

Why are they important?

Virtual exhibitions are important because they can be used to promote artistic, cultural and historical information through the web. Individuals from all over the world can access a wealth of knowledge through this kind of visual resource.

How do you make them?

Listed below are a number of free applications that can be used to make virtual exhibitions.

ArtSteps is a website that gives users various room layouts while also providing a customizable option. You can configure the gallery space, select a colour scheme and upload your own photos. The resulting gallery can be shared through different social media platforms and easily embedded into blogs.

VAS- Virtual Art Space is similar to ArtSteps insofar as users can customize a gallery space and upload content, however, it boasts a simpler user interface.

Google Open Gallery requires users to request an invitation, which may take a few days. While the interface is clean and visually pleasing, users are not given the option to customize a gallery space. Instead, each image is presented alone, with a zoom feature and description.

Examples of Virtual Exhibitions:

1. The Art Gallery of Greater Victoria has created a number of virtual exhibits for their collections. Mansion Madness: Mystery at Gyppeswyck and Exploring Japan are particularly informative and navigable.

2. The Katharine MacLennan exhibit created by The Beaton Institute, Cape Breton Regional Library, Fortress of Louisbourg Association and Parks Canada.

3. The 1812 Virtual Exhibition developed by the Canadian War Museum.

Sources

Carmo, Maria Beatriz and Ana Paula Claudio. “3D Virtual Exhibitions.” Journal of Library and Information Technology. 33.3 (May 2013): 222-235.

Sabharwal, Arjun. “Digital Representation of Disability History: Developing a Virtual Exhibition.” Archival Issues. 34.1 (2012): 7-26.

Getty Images Unveils Innovative Embed Feature

The world’s largest photo service, Getty Images, made a big announcement today! All 35 million Getty images have been removed of their watermarks. Now anyone can use embed codes to display images for non-commercial purposes on blogs and social media sites, free of charge and without worry of legal consequences.

To post an image, simply click on the “embed” icon (</>), copy the link provided, and paste away. For a step-by-step tutorial, check out the Getty Images website, or jump right in and start searching here.

The Canadian Online Book Project

In the fall of 2013, The Art Canada Institute announced that it would be releasing 6 to 12 digital art books on an annual basis for the next five years. This online initiative aims to promote Canadian artists by making these digital art books freely available through their website in both official languages.

MunnThumbnailA2

Sara Angel, the founding executive director of The ACI, had the following to say about the projects intention to take the country’s cultural discussion across mediums: “We want to tell the story of our nation’s art history, bringing audiences closer to our extraordinary artists — some of whom are world-renowned and others who aren’t yet household names but should be — in a smart, accessible format, designed for expanding online audiences.”

For more information, click here.

VAH4482G: Art, Photography and “New” Media

This research guide covers:

  • How to conduct research
  • Searching for images
  • Searching for advertisements
  • Searching for academic articles
  • Citing
  • Where to find help

1. How to Conduct Research

a) Concept mapping - a visual representation of the concepts related to a topic, and the relationships between these concepts. This technique enables researchers to understand big-picture patterns within their research, and concept maps are also useful when conducting literature searches. Click here for more information.

b) Search Techniques Video: Developing Search Terms Video: Putting Together your Search Terms

Search string example: (“factory” OR “sweatshop”) AND (“Bangladesh” OR “Rana Plaza” OR “Savar” OR “Dhaka”) AND “collapse”

2. Searching for Images

a) newspapers – with images

Factiva - provides full-text access to international newspapers, business journals, and market research reports. Click here to watch a YouTube video on how to use Factiva, produced by the University of Texas Libraries.
Tip: perform keyword search and refine results by clicking on “pictures” in upper tab

Alt-Press Watch - includes full-text articles from alternative and independent press.
Tip: after performing a search, refines results by “document feature” and select “photographs” (right hand column).

r1

b) newspapers – without images

Canadian Newsstand Major Dailies - includes full-text articles from the leading Canadian news sources

Lexis Nexis Academic - a portal to full-text documents from business, legal and reference publications

Finding images in these newspaper articles might involve some detective work! You might have to search for the publication through the Western Libraries catalogue and obtain the original document or microfilm. Visit the help desk at the D.B. Weldon Library if you need assistance finding these materials.

© 2012 image courtesy of Will Hart via Flickr Creative Commons
© 2012 image courtesy of Will Hart via Flickr Creative Commons

For more news sources available through Western Libraries, check out the Journalism subject guide (not to mention the Visual Arts subject guide!)

3. Searching for advertisements

ProQuest Entertainment Industry Magazine Archive - contains full-text articles from US and UK trade magazines that cover film, music, broadcasting and theatre.
Tip: Type your search terms into the advanced search field, and select “advertisement” under the “document type” section before clicking “search”

Ad*Access – includes over 7,000 advertisements printed in U.S. and Canadian newspapers and magazines between 1911 and 1955. Users can browse by company, product, date, etc.

4. Searching for academic articles

Summon – Western Libraries’ “discovery layer” enables users to access a range of content using a single-search method. Refine your search using the left-hand column.

Catalogue – Search for books and journal titles available through Western Libraries.

Visual Arts Program Guide - there is more out there!

5. Citing Sources

Consult the guidelines posted on OWL Western Libraries’ Style Guides (Chicago Style)

How to Cite Images in Chicago Style (link to a guide by the Colgate Visual Resources Library)

Check out RefWorks, software that is available to Western students that helps you organize your citations and create bibliographies with the click of a mouse.

6. Where to find help

Need help? Contact Claire Parker (claire.parker@uwo.ca) or swing by the VRL (VAC241A)

VAH2236G: What (Not) to Wear: Fashion, Textiles and Art II

1. Searching for Images

Subscriptions

Artstor - provides over 1.6 million digital images in arts, architecture, humanities and sciences. You must register for an account to download images.

Need to login for off-campus access (right-hand side of Western Libraries homepage)
Click red “enter here” button to access the Artstor Digital Library
Click “register” (top right-hand side of screen) if you plan on downloading images. You must use your uwo email address.
Advance search functions available
Browse option available: browse by “Classification” and then select “Fashion, Costume and Jewelry.” Results can be filtered by country.

Museum Websites

The Costume Institute at the MET

Click “view all artworks within the Costume Institute” (bottom of page)
Filter by “who” “what” “where” “when”

The Museum at FIT

Search the collection here
Quick search and advanced search options available

The Victoria & Albert Museum

Browse by “subject hubs”
Search the entire collection here (includes content other than fashion and costume)

The Kyoto Costume Museum

Select “English” (right-hand side) 200 items in the collection are available online here

The Balenciaga Museum

Search the collection here
Only quick search available
Search results include detailed historical information about the piece

The Gucci Museum

Brief articles describe the contents of each floor of the Gucci Museum
The museum does not exclusively display Gucci products; there are contemporary art installations in the galleries
No option to search collections

Designer Websites

Valentino Garagani Museum

An online museum featuring 500 documents, which have been installed in a 3D Palazzo

2. How to Conduct Research

Concept mapping - a visual representation of the concepts related to a topic, and the relationships between these concepts. This technique enables researchers to understand big-picture patterns within their research, and concept maps are also useful when conducting literature searches. Click here for more information.

Search Techniques Video: Developing Search Terms Video: Putting Together your Search Terms

example search string: (“high fashion” OR “haute couture” OR “fashion design” OR “designer fashion”) AND (“visual art” OR “contemporary art” OR “modern art”) AND (“hip-hop” OR “rap music”)

3. How to find Textual Materials

a) books, journal articles, journal titles

Summon – Western Libraries’ “discovery layer” enables users to access a range of content using a single-search method. Refine your search using the left-hand column.

Catalogue – Search for books and journal titles available through Western Libraries. Visual Arts Program Guide

b) newspaper articles with images

Factiva - provides full-text access to international newspapers, business journals, and market research reports. Click here to watch a YouTube video on how to use Factiva, produced by the University of Texas Libraries.
Tip: perform keyword search and refine results by clicking on “pictures” in upper tab

4. Citing Sources

Style: Consult the guidelines posted on OWL Western Libraries’ Style Guides (Chicago Style)

How to Cite Images in Chicago Style (link to a guide by the Colgate Visual Resources Library)

Citation Management: RefWorks

5. Contact Information

 Need help? Contact Claire Parker (claire.parker@uwo.ca) or swing by the VRL (VAC241A)

accessCeramics: A Contemporary Ceramics Image Resource

The Archive

Organized by the Art Department of Lewis & Clark College and the Visual Resources Center of Watzek Library, accessCeramics is an online image collection that documents contemporary ceramics. The site features a traditional metadata framework that one would expect from an academic digital image collection (Dublin Core and VRA Core are used). Content from accessCeramics is also available on Flickr, presumably because of the software and social media capabilities afforded.

A great feature of accessCeramics is that each image in the collection is assigned a Creative Commons license. This allows users to use content in various ways. Also, accessCeramics has a minimum quality standard to ensure that images are sufficient for classroom projection.  The archive defines this as having a short end of at least 768 pixels, a long end of at least 1024 pixels.

Browsing

A major strength of this archive is the browse function; a great deal of effort has gone into metadata tagging. When you hover over the ‘browse’ menu, you can choose to browse by institution, collection, artist, glazing/surface, material, object type, technique, or temperature.

Ted Vogel, Silver Branch, 2006. Image available through accessCeramics at http://accessceramics.org/viewimage/38/. © 2006 Ted Vogel, licensed through Creative Commons.

Ted Vogel, Silver Branch, 2006. Image available through accessCeramics. © 2006 Ted Vogel, licensed through Creative Commons.

I found the above image by browsing the material silver leaf, which returned 9 image results. As an experiment, I tried to access the same image through as many other access points as I could, based on the tags in the description. I found it by viewing all of Ted Vogel’s submitted works; the techniques Slab-built and Press Mold; the temperature Cone 04; the surface treatment/glazing Electric Oxidation; the materials Earthenware, glass, and digital image; and the object type Wall Piece. In short, the metadata listed in the image details are true access points for browsing.

The other major browsing feature is by artist, which allows you to either view an alphabetical list, or a world map showing locations of artists who have submitted images.

Conclusion

The archive is by no means perfect. There is some inconsistency with the tags. For example, the tag ‘Slab-built’ is different from ‘slab built’ and will not lead you to the same results. It would also be useful if users could click on each tag in the image details to view other images in that category. These are small complaints, however, and do not detract from the robustness of this image archive. The options for browsing and viewing are varied and useful, and the image quality is fantastic. This repository is well worth a look!